Chapter 7: Energizing the Groundswell

This chapter was very interesting and a good read, as it was very relatable and easy to understand. The first thing to distinguish with the groundswell is what is energizing? (Li & Bernoff, 2011, p. 130)

  • It’s believable
  • Its self-reinforcing
  • Its self spreading

These are the things that I personally listen for when deciding to buy a product/service after a marketing message, either from a person or from the company itself. Since the groundswell is so honest in the first place, the next thing I look for is whether it’s believable and I can understand why it’s been self-spreading.

The next thing to look for with enthusiasts amplifying your product, are how they can connect with the community.

3 basic techniques for connecting with your enthusiasts:

  1. Tap into customers enthusiasm with ratings and reviews
  2. Create a community to energize your customers
  3. Participate in and energize online communities of your brand enthusiasts

(Li & Bernoff, 2011, p. 134)

With these simple techniques in mind, it’s fun to energize the groundswell and get products off the ground. With companies small and large, but especially small, it’s very important to stay within the law. It’s easy to get off target and potentially break some of the anti-spam laws in place. Marketing e-mails can work, but as soon as you cross the line with it, you’re considered spam, and nobody likes that making your messages automatically trash.

5 Steps for applying the techniques of energizing your own organization:

  1. Figure out if you want to energize the groundswell
  2. Check the social technographics profile of your customers
  3. Ask yourself, “What is my customer’s problem?”
  4. Pick a strategy that fits your customers social technographics profile and problems
  5. Don’t start unless you can stick around for the long haul

(Li & Bernoff, 2011, pp. 148-149)

 

Event Planning

When it comes to my business of event planning, the groundswell naturally emerges with comments, reviews and ratings online. When it comes to big events such as weddings, the clients naturally are so immersed with their family and friends that the little things that may or may not have gone wrong get lost in translation. When it comes time to look back on their big day, they are still buzzing with energy on how well their day went, but because we are only human there may be one or two things that could be have been executed better. With those things highlighted, we are able to grow off that and improve those imperfections for our next client.

Clients and guests of our events buzz with excitement to their collogues about how great the party was next week, and the common question from the people they are raving to is… “Who did they hire to plan everything?” … -“B Entertaining”… BOOM, our name is out there, and the word-of-mouth cycle begins. Those people who attended, heard stories or just spectators online are going to look us up and they will be able to not only read the reviews, but begin to search our services and fees, and begin to plan their own event. Our service alone of planning partied energizes all the guests and creates an atmosphere that leaves them talking about our service to their friends and family after the big event is finished. “Word of mouth is the most honest form of marketing, building upon people’s natural desire to share their experiences with family, friends, and colleagues. It can’t be faked” (Li & Bernoff, 2011, p. 131).

 

 

Cheers,
B

 

 


References

Federal Trade Commission. (2017, March). CAN-SPAM Act: A Compliance Guide for Business . Retrieved from Federal Trade Commission Protecting America’s Consumers : https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/can-spam-act-compliance-guide-business

Government of Canada. (2017, June). Canada’s Law on Spam and other Electronic Threats. Retrieved from Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation: http://fightspam.gc.ca/eic/site/030.nsf/eng/home

Li, C., & Bernoff, J. (2011). Groundswell: winning in a world transformed by social technologies. Boston, Massachusetts, USA: Harvard Business School Publishing .

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