Chapter 5: Listening to the Groundswell

We’ve all been there. We have a doctor’s appointment at lets say 1pm. After an hour and a half or two, of waiting, we finally get ushered to the doctor’s office. We then sit there in the boring, white room, with blinding florescent lighting for another 30 minutes. Finally the doctor arrives and a quick a body check up and prescription form is filled out in a record breaking 20 minutes. Now imagine if everyone operated this way, not just high paid professions who seem to not care about other people’s time. A wedding is to be held at 2pm. The guests arrive a couple minutes early to be seated by then, but the bride doesn’t show up until 2:30, delaying her walk down the aisle to 3. It disregards the point of having start times if no one listens to them. The very beginning of the chapter brought the doctors case up and immediately that caught my attention as to what the rest of the chapter had to say regarding ‘listening to the groundswell’.

Listening to the groundswell means going out and interacting with your consumers, and listen to what they have to say about your product/service (Li & Bernoff, 2011). Negative comments from the groundswell are just at good, as the positive because it gives you something to improve upon. By listening to what your people want and don’t want, gives you an upper hand with the competition. People appreciate good listeners, as they come rare. I learned from this chapter, that listening may be one of the most valuable tools in the business world, especially for an industry like hospitality. Event planning is something I specifically want to do one day, and if I don’t listen to my boss and clients I will get nowhere with my job and be very unsuccessful. “Listening is the most essential, neglected skill in business today” (Li & Bernoff, 2011). Listening to what people want for their party, directs my future actions to take, and what to avoid/ head for in terms of themes and other little details. Hospitality is a very, very personable industry and it’s the little details that separate good talent, from exceptional talent. The inside scoop of the groundswell is crucial to be successful. From this chapter discuss how listening is one thing, but to learn from listening is another. As a business person, you must be willing to put yourself out there and change a few things from what you have heard, to enhance the experience. “The guests is always right”, is something that is taught day one in the hospitality world, and it’s true. They are the ones paying for your service, and giving you revenue, so you must hear them out.

Cheers,

B

 

 


References

Li, C., & Bernoff, J. (2011). Groundswell: winning in a world transformed by social technologies. Boston, Massachusetts, USA: Harvard Business School Publishing .

 

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Chapter 3 Technographic

This chapter is filled with many interesting facts about the research done about different users across the world, the social technographics. The amount of stats collected are shocking of how different they are from North America, China and Europe. The technographic world is divided into 7 but not limited to, inactive, spectators, joiners, collectors, critics, conversationalists, and creators. These categories overlap in several areas. For example, many users who are creators are also spectators (Li & Bernoff, 2011). This chapter is interesting because you always learn to divide your audience by age, sex, occupation, etcetera, but not so much by their online activity.

In the hospitality industry, there would be many technographics used on social media. The same type of categories would apply, but I think that there would be less, even no inactive users. I think that if you are in the industry, you are active in some way, even just as a spectator. For a company like Rogers Place, they would have many spectators, conversationalists, and joiners. Those would be the 3 main categories, overlapping of course, followed by critics, joiners, and creators. I say creators near the bottom of the list because the Rogers Place would be the ones creating most of the content being discussed, and not so much the public. To put Rogers Place in an example of how their social technographic profile would work, let’s use the Edmonton Oiler season opener game. After this year’s impressive playoff run, the city was buzzin and still is, with excitement for next season already. Rogers Entertainment would create a platform with the teams recap and highlights to get everyone excited. This would be viewed by many spectators and filled with comments by both critics and conversationalists. They could also create a platform for conservations that could be open for the public, and sport analysts. Conversationalists love platforms that allow them to discuss their excitement for the team, and ideas for the complex and transportation to enhance their experience more. Having a comment section for critics and commenters, gives Rogers a better insight to what works and what doesn’t. Their guests are their main priority, and it’s important to hear their voice. Technographics is a very important tool for Rogers Place to utilize. They will be able to provide more for the public and in turn benefit from their participation.

Cheers,

B

 

 


References

Li, C., & Bernoff, J. (2011). Groundswell: winning in a world transformed by social technologies. Boston, Massachusetts, USA: Harvard Business School Publishing .

Users of the World, Unite! The Challenges and Opportunities of Social Media.

Anyone living in 2017 knows that social media comes with many challenges, as well several opportunities. The networking platform has amplified the way business people and everyday users interact with one another. The article by Kelley School of Business, outlines the history of social media and from where it sprung.

First thing is first, what is social media? Social media has developed from Web 2.0, which “is a platform whereby content and applications are no longer created and published by individuals, but instead are continuously modified by all users in a participatory and collaborative fashion” (Kaplan & Haenlein, 2010). Social media is used to interact with others on a personal level, but also used by companies for marketing reasons. Listed in the article are the different types of platforms within the internet world such as, collaborative projects, blogs- like this-, content communities, social networking sites, virtual game worlds, and virtual social worlds (Kaplan & Haenlein, 2010).

A point in the article that caught my attention was the 10 points of advice for companies using social media. (Kaplan & Haenlein, 2010) . They are as follows:

  1. Choose carefully
  2. Pick the application or make your own
  3. Ensure activity alignment
  4. Media plan integration
  5. Access for all
  6. Be active
  7. Be interesting
  8. Be humble
  9. Be professional
  10. Be honest

All of these are important but the ones that really stuck out were “Choose carefully”, “access for all”, and “be humble”.

Choose carefully they say…meaning, choose the platform that best enhances and encourages your company goals. There are many different platforms out there, with many more emerging. It’s crucial to pick a suitable one without getting distracted by other ones that could be more timely and expensive in the long run. In an industry like hospitality, you need a platform that can properly market your company but take input from the customers as well. Hospitality is such an interactive, people-oriented industry that transparency is important when choosing a social media tool.

Access for all was an interesting point to me, because I never really had thought about access control within a company before. I understand in an office setting blocking social sites like Facebook, and twitter to ensure productivity is happening, but in the hospitality industry that I want to be in, I think access should be granted to all. Now in saying that, access to freedom is both a right and a privilege. As long as deadlines are meant, I believe that staff should be able to interact with the company page and be social, to an extent. Access to admin is something that would be exclusive and should be, in my opinion, to management. Access to staff can be beneficial because everyone is different, and has different tastes, allowing them to reach out to a great mass of the public. The more diversity, the better- with the aligned goal in mind.

Just be humble. In your personal life, in the workplace, and to strangers. We are all human, and we make mistakes. This point in the article blends well with being “unprofessional”. There is a fine line between being professional and being humble. Hospitality is an outgoing industry, and the social media that goes along with it should be fun and outgoing as well. In saying that, you can be both professional and unprofessional at the same time. You can state your promotions in a professional way, but with a less professional sway to it, a while being humble. We are human, and are surrounded by seriousness everyday. Seeing a funny ad, or promotion is much more memorable and makes a company seem more approachable. In my experience an approachable company is pretty humble as well. They know where they started from, and they have their goals in mind, but they enjoy their job while doing all these things. In my experience being the marketing manager at Earls St. Albert, our guests respond much more to our posts that are funny, interactive and non-scripted. People can tell when words have been laid out for you to say, and they prefer real, genuine, and humble thoughts.

The article sums up the important aspects of social media today, and the do’s and don’ts. From my perspective, with the influence of hospitality, I think it’s important to define your marketing goals, research all the different tools out there and experiment. In the end though, use the tools you feel most comfortable with, the tools that are engaging your audience, and to have fun with it. Work is work, but it can be fun.

Cheers,

B

 

 


References

Kaplan, A. M., & Haenlein, M. (2010). Users of the world, unite! The challenges and opportunities of Social Media. Business Horizons , 53, 59-68.